Title

Effect of Thermal Cycling on Repaired Lead and Lead-Free Solder Joints

Presenter Information

Vanessa Eckhoff

Department

Materials Science and Engineering

Major

Metallurgical Engineering

Research Advisor

O'Keefe, Matthew

Advisor's Department

Materials Science and Engineering

Funding Source

CAMT - Air Force

Abstract

Numerous laws have been passed in recent years either prohibiting or greatly limiting the use of lead (Pb). As a result, tin lead (SnPb) solders are being replaced with lead free (LF) solders in assembly of electronic products. This study examined the effect of thermal cycling on SnPb, LF, and mixed SnPb/LF repaired solder joints. Four different types of electronic components were originally attached to printed circuit boards using SnPb solders. The solder joints were then repaired with either SnPb or LF solders and components. The repaired boards were then subjected to 1000 thermal cycles between -55°C to 125°C. Resistance measurements were taken before, during, and after thermal cycling. All solder joints were then examined with a digital imaging system to look for cracks and opens. The components were then sectioned, mounted and polished to allow examination of the solder/solder pad interface and changes in microstructure.

Biography

Vanessa Eckhoff is an undergraduate student in the Material Science and Engineering department at UMR.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Presentation Date

12 Apr 2006, 1:00 pm

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Apr 12th, 1:00 PM

Effect of Thermal Cycling on Repaired Lead and Lead-Free Solder Joints

Numerous laws have been passed in recent years either prohibiting or greatly limiting the use of lead (Pb). As a result, tin lead (SnPb) solders are being replaced with lead free (LF) solders in assembly of electronic products. This study examined the effect of thermal cycling on SnPb, LF, and mixed SnPb/LF repaired solder joints. Four different types of electronic components were originally attached to printed circuit boards using SnPb solders. The solder joints were then repaired with either SnPb or LF solders and components. The repaired boards were then subjected to 1000 thermal cycles between -55°C to 125°C. Resistance measurements were taken before, during, and after thermal cycling. All solder joints were then examined with a digital imaging system to look for cracks and opens. The components were then sectioned, mounted and polished to allow examination of the solder/solder pad interface and changes in microstructure.