Title

Analysis and Optimization of Partial Power Flow Calculations for the Power Grid

Presenter Information

Josh M. Eads

Department

Computer Science

Major

Computer Science, Mathematics

Research Advisor

Tauritz, Daniel R.
Smorodkina, Kate

Advisor's Department

Computer Science

Abstract

Because of recent awareness of the vulnerability of the power grid in the United States, current research has focused on finding a rapid response method for protecting the system from cascading blackouts. This paper focuses on a method of controlling the power grid through Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS) devices to prevent excessive line overloading from occurring. Partial Power Flow (PPF) was proposed in a previous paper as a method to accelerate the calculations of power flow through the system during the optimization of the FACTS device settings. Methods used to connect the disjoint components during PPF are described in detail along with the effects these methods have on the speed of partial power flow. Finally, where it was previously thought that connecting the disjoint components leads to a monotonic speed increase, this paper shows that this is not always true and explores the reasons why the increase is not monotonic.

Biography

Josh M. Eads is a freshman at the University of Missouri--Rolla majoring in Computer Science and Applied Mathematics. He is actively involved with Rolla’s ACM chapter and currently working on interdisciplinary research on increased fault tolerance of the power grid through FACTS devices. Josh plans to continue his education and research as a graduate student after completing his degrees in Computer Science and Math.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Presentation Date

12 Apr 2006, 10:00 am

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 12th, 10:00 AM

Analysis and Optimization of Partial Power Flow Calculations for the Power Grid

Because of recent awareness of the vulnerability of the power grid in the United States, current research has focused on finding a rapid response method for protecting the system from cascading blackouts. This paper focuses on a method of controlling the power grid through Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS) devices to prevent excessive line overloading from occurring. Partial Power Flow (PPF) was proposed in a previous paper as a method to accelerate the calculations of power flow through the system during the optimization of the FACTS device settings. Methods used to connect the disjoint components during PPF are described in detail along with the effects these methods have on the speed of partial power flow. Finally, where it was previously thought that connecting the disjoint components leads to a monotonic speed increase, this paper shows that this is not always true and explores the reasons why the increase is not monotonic.