Title

Analysis of Phenocryst Textures and Crystal Size Distribution, Carlton Rhyolite, Wichita Mountains, Southwestern Oklahoma

Presenter Information

Ryan Davidson

Department

Geosciences and Geological and Petroleum Engineering

Major

Geology

Research Advisor

Hogan, John Patrick

Advisor's Department

Geosciences and Geological and Petroleum Engineering

Funding Source

UMR Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE)

Abstract

The Carlton Rhyolite of the Wichita Mountains of Southwest Oklahoma is a porphyritic rhyolite with phenocrysts of subhedral to anhedral, heavily resorbed quartz (0.15 - 4 mm in size) and anhedral to euhedral potassium feldspar (0.75 - 6mm in size), with the top of the formation being richer in feldspar and the bottom being richer in quartz - consistent with magma chamber inversion during eruption and emplacement of the flow. Rare broken crystals and flow banding present towards the bottom of the formation favors deposition by flow rather than by ash fall. Crystal size distribution analysis of the rock has given preliminary results due to small population sizes and resorption of small crystals.

Biography

Ryan Davidson is a senior majoring in Geology at the University of Missouri--Rolla. Graduating in May, he will be attending the Colorado School of Mines graduate program in geological engineering.

Research Category

Natural Sciences

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Presentation Date

12 Apr 2006, 9:30 am

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Apr 12th, 9:30 AM

Analysis of Phenocryst Textures and Crystal Size Distribution, Carlton Rhyolite, Wichita Mountains, Southwestern Oklahoma

The Carlton Rhyolite of the Wichita Mountains of Southwest Oklahoma is a porphyritic rhyolite with phenocrysts of subhedral to anhedral, heavily resorbed quartz (0.15 - 4 mm in size) and anhedral to euhedral potassium feldspar (0.75 - 6mm in size), with the top of the formation being richer in feldspar and the bottom being richer in quartz - consistent with magma chamber inversion during eruption and emplacement of the flow. Rare broken crystals and flow banding present towards the bottom of the formation favors deposition by flow rather than by ash fall. Crystal size distribution analysis of the rock has given preliminary results due to small population sizes and resorption of small crystals.