Masters Theses

Author

Mukund Nemali

Abstract

Hydraulic actuators are used with accuracy and dependability in equipment for moving loads. Automation in this equipment is very essential to ensure a safe and accurate operation. Automation can require sensing of the movements of linkages attached to the hydraulic cylinders. This sensing can be accomplished by directly sensing the stroke of the piston in the hydraulic cylinder.

In this thesis a method for sensing the stroke of the piston in a hydraulic cylinder is examined. An analysis of the cylinder piston system is required to understand the dynamics inside the system. A mathematical model is derived that describes the dynamics of this system. Using EASY5 software the piston cylinder system is simulated and the results are analyzed to study the feasibility of the method. Experiments were performed to prove that this method works for measuring the stroke of pistons in hydraulic cylinders. The experiments gave satisfactory results.

Pressure oscillations at each position of the piston are measured. The pressure signals output is processed using a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to detect the natural frequencies of the system. The position of the piston and hence its stroke is measured using the natural frequency of pressure oscillations as the position of the piston is directly related to the natural frequency

Advisor(s)

Flanigan, V. J.

Committee Member(s)

Drallmeier, J. A.
Fu, Yongjian

Department(s)

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Degree Name

M.S. in Mechanical Engineering

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

Fall 2000

Pagination

ix, 56 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (page 55).

Rights

© 2000 Mukund Nemali, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Restricted Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Thesis Number

T 7810

Print OCLC #

45687491

Link to Catalog Record

Electronic access to the full-text of this document is restricted to Missouri S&T users. Otherwise, request this publication directly from Missouri S&T Library or contact your local library.

http://laurel.lso.missouri.edu/record=b4498035~S5

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