Location

San Diego, California

Session Start Date

5-24-2010

Session End Date

5-29-2010

Abstract

An energy approach evaluating travel distance of debris in slope failures is proposed here, in which earthquake energy and gravitational potential energy are dissipated in flow deformations. Shake table model tests of dry sand slopes are carried out in which the earthquake energy dissipated in slope failure can be successfully quantified. The model tests indicate that measured slope displacements can be reliably evaluated by the proposed energy approach based on a rigid block model if an appropriate friction coefficient of the slope is specified. The energy approach is then applied to a number of slopes failed during recent earthquake in Japan to back-calculate mobilized friction coefficients, revealing their strong dependency on initial slope inclinations. It is clarified that the earthquake energy is actually much smaller than the potential energy for most of large slides, though it plays an important role of triggering slides. The friction coefficients are found smaller than the initial slope inclinations for gentler slopes, indicating that the failed soil masses tend to accelerate during sliding. The friction coefficients tend to decrease with increasing volume of failed slopes, which is compatible with previous case studies including large non-seismic landslides.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

5-24-2010

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2010 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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May 24th, 12:00 AM May 29th, 12:00 AM

Case Histories and Energy-Based Evaluation on Travel Distance of Slope Failures During Recent Earthquakes

San Diego, California

An energy approach evaluating travel distance of debris in slope failures is proposed here, in which earthquake energy and gravitational potential energy are dissipated in flow deformations. Shake table model tests of dry sand slopes are carried out in which the earthquake energy dissipated in slope failure can be successfully quantified. The model tests indicate that measured slope displacements can be reliably evaluated by the proposed energy approach based on a rigid block model if an appropriate friction coefficient of the slope is specified. The energy approach is then applied to a number of slopes failed during recent earthquake in Japan to back-calculate mobilized friction coefficients, revealing their strong dependency on initial slope inclinations. It is clarified that the earthquake energy is actually much smaller than the potential energy for most of large slides, though it plays an important role of triggering slides. The friction coefficients are found smaller than the initial slope inclinations for gentler slopes, indicating that the failed soil masses tend to accelerate during sliding. The friction coefficients tend to decrease with increasing volume of failed slopes, which is compatible with previous case studies including large non-seismic landslides.