Location

San Diego, California

Session Start Date

5-24-2010

Session End Date

5-29-2010

Abstract

The paper describes a testing methodology, instrumentation array and example data interpretation for reduced-scale geosynthetic reinforced soil (GRS) wall models built on a large shaking table. The testing program is unique in the literature because of the large number of different instruments deployed and the use of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) analysis of imagery captured using a high speed camera. The models are instrumented with strain gauges and extensometers attached to the geogrid reinforcing layers, LVDTs attached to the facing panel, load cells at the wall toe, reinforcement-facing load measurement, and accelerometers in the backfill and along the facing. Example measurements are reported that demonstrate the value of the experimental technique to better understand the mechanics of these systems under simulated earthquake.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

5-24-2010

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2010 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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May 24th, 12:00 AM May 29th, 12:00 AM

Shaking Table Methodology and Instrumentation for Reinforced Soil Retaining Walls

San Diego, California

The paper describes a testing methodology, instrumentation array and example data interpretation for reduced-scale geosynthetic reinforced soil (GRS) wall models built on a large shaking table. The testing program is unique in the literature because of the large number of different instruments deployed and the use of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) analysis of imagery captured using a high speed camera. The models are instrumented with strain gauges and extensometers attached to the geogrid reinforcing layers, LVDTs attached to the facing panel, load cells at the wall toe, reinforcement-facing load measurement, and accelerometers in the backfill and along the facing. Example measurements are reported that demonstrate the value of the experimental technique to better understand the mechanics of these systems under simulated earthquake.