Location

San Diego, California

Session Start Date

5-24-2010

Session End Date

5-29-2010

Abstract

Underground structures such as tunnels have a lower unit weight than the surrounding soil and are commonly deemed to be susceptible to floatation in liquefiable soil. In the process of floatation, the tunnel has to possess ample buoyancy force to shear and carry the overlying soil upwards. This is aided by soil liquefaction resulting from the increase in water pressure with number of earthquake loading cycles. With onset of liquefaction, effective stress decreases which lead to a reduction in the shear strength of soil, hence assisting the floatation of tunnel. Conversely, the total stress exerted by the overburden soil suppresses the process. A series of centrifuge tests were conducted to investigate the floatation of tunnels in liquefiable sand deposits. This paper discusses the initiation and cessation of the floatation as well as the floatation susceptibility of varying depths of tunnels.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

5-24-2010

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2010 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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May 24th, 12:00 AM May 29th, 12:00 AM

Floatation of Tunnel in Liquefiable Soil

San Diego, California

Underground structures such as tunnels have a lower unit weight than the surrounding soil and are commonly deemed to be susceptible to floatation in liquefiable soil. In the process of floatation, the tunnel has to possess ample buoyancy force to shear and carry the overlying soil upwards. This is aided by soil liquefaction resulting from the increase in water pressure with number of earthquake loading cycles. With onset of liquefaction, effective stress decreases which lead to a reduction in the shear strength of soil, hence assisting the floatation of tunnel. Conversely, the total stress exerted by the overburden soil suppresses the process. A series of centrifuge tests were conducted to investigate the floatation of tunnels in liquefiable sand deposits. This paper discusses the initiation and cessation of the floatation as well as the floatation susceptibility of varying depths of tunnels.