Location

San Diego, California

Session Start Date

5-24-2010

Session End Date

5-29-2010

Abstract

An underwater reinforced concrete tunnel roof is subjected to an internal gas explosion. Dynamic analyses are performed for three cases, namely, (1) an uncoupled solution, (2) class II coupling analysis and (3) full model with class I and II couplings. Three load cases are considered, dead (gravity) load, uniformly distributed vertical loads from sand and water and finally an internal pressure gas explosion. Linear and non-linear constitutive relationships are considered for the materials constituting the gas explosion problem. Results include time deflection of tunnel roof, time histories of stresses in vertical reinforcing bars and contours of concrete stresses for tunnel roof. By conducting analyses from various models, the question whether the tunnel would be damaged to such an extent that its serviceability would be impaired is investigated.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

5-24-2010

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2010 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

COinS
 
May 24th, 12:00 AM May 29th, 12:00 AM

Effects of Internal Gas Explosion on an Underwater Tunnel Roof

San Diego, California

An underwater reinforced concrete tunnel roof is subjected to an internal gas explosion. Dynamic analyses are performed for three cases, namely, (1) an uncoupled solution, (2) class II coupling analysis and (3) full model with class I and II couplings. Three load cases are considered, dead (gravity) load, uniformly distributed vertical loads from sand and water and finally an internal pressure gas explosion. Linear and non-linear constitutive relationships are considered for the materials constituting the gas explosion problem. Results include time deflection of tunnel roof, time histories of stresses in vertical reinforcing bars and contours of concrete stresses for tunnel roof. By conducting analyses from various models, the question whether the tunnel would be damaged to such an extent that its serviceability would be impaired is investigated.