Location

San Diego, California

Session Start Date

5-24-2010

Session End Date

5-29-2010

Abstract

Ground displacements resulting from earthquake-induced soil liquefaction and dynamic densification can cause moderate to severe structural damage during and after an earthquake. Geotechnical construction methods of mitigating these potential ground displacements include mass excavation and replacement with engineered fill, ground improvement such as soil mixing, jet grouting, compaction piers, vibro compaction, vibro stone columns, and deep dynamic compaction, or deep foundations such as driven piles. The ground improvement methods rely on altering the soil properties to resist the seismically-induced shear stresses and soil grain redistribution while deep foundation methods bypass liquefiable soil deposits to found in deeper competent soil or rock. This paper presents an advancement in displacement ground improvement methods used to control soil liquefaction potential by driving highly compacted aggregate into the soil deposit. The ground improvement is accomplished by driving a pipe mandrel to displace the soil mass, backfilling the cavity with select aggregate, and compacting the aggregate in controlled lifts utilizing vertical, vibratory driven methods to further displace and densify the soil deposit while creating a dense Rammed Aggregate Pier®. Specifically the ground improvement method 1) reinforces the soil deposit to resist and re-distribute seismic shear stresses, 2) increases the density and horizontal stress of the surrounding soil, and 3) provides a gravel drain to enhance dissipation of seismicallyinduced excess pore water pressure in the soil. Several projects performed in California, in areas of high seismic activity, have been tested for the resulting shear reinforcement effects and increased density effects manifested by this advanced method of construction. These projects and their resulting field test results are presented and discussed.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

5-24-2010

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2010 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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May 24th, 12:00 AM May 29th, 12:00 AM

Liquefaction Mitigation of Three Projects in California

San Diego, California

Ground displacements resulting from earthquake-induced soil liquefaction and dynamic densification can cause moderate to severe structural damage during and after an earthquake. Geotechnical construction methods of mitigating these potential ground displacements include mass excavation and replacement with engineered fill, ground improvement such as soil mixing, jet grouting, compaction piers, vibro compaction, vibro stone columns, and deep dynamic compaction, or deep foundations such as driven piles. The ground improvement methods rely on altering the soil properties to resist the seismically-induced shear stresses and soil grain redistribution while deep foundation methods bypass liquefiable soil deposits to found in deeper competent soil or rock. This paper presents an advancement in displacement ground improvement methods used to control soil liquefaction potential by driving highly compacted aggregate into the soil deposit. The ground improvement is accomplished by driving a pipe mandrel to displace the soil mass, backfilling the cavity with select aggregate, and compacting the aggregate in controlled lifts utilizing vertical, vibratory driven methods to further displace and densify the soil deposit while creating a dense Rammed Aggregate Pier®. Specifically the ground improvement method 1) reinforces the soil deposit to resist and re-distribute seismic shear stresses, 2) increases the density and horizontal stress of the surrounding soil, and 3) provides a gravel drain to enhance dissipation of seismicallyinduced excess pore water pressure in the soil. Several projects performed in California, in areas of high seismic activity, have been tested for the resulting shear reinforcement effects and increased density effects manifested by this advanced method of construction. These projects and their resulting field test results are presented and discussed.