Location

San Diego, California

Session Start Date

5-24-2010

Session End Date

5-29-2010

Abstract

Shear strain amplitude γ is an important quantity in dynamic soil analysis. Usually, a reduction of soil stiffness with increasing shear strain amplitude is observed in laboratory tests. An appropriate invariant of shear strain can be defined which is comparable with shear strains measured in laboratory tests. Usually, shear wave velocity cs is determined from field or laboratory tests and the particle velocity v is obtained from vibration measurements. Afterwards, the shear strain amplitude γ is often estimated from the equation γ = ν / cs, which can be derived for the case of one dimensional wave propagation. Based on numerical analyses with FEM, the validity of the above equation for γ is checked. It can be shown that there is a clear differ-ence between the zone close to the loading area and the zone at a larger distance from the loading area. Experimental results of vibration measurements in the field and the evaluation of dynamic soil properties due to rail traffic are pre-sented and the impact on permanent soil deformations is discussed. Based on the results of the field measurements and the numerical calculations recommendations on the determination of γ for dynamic analysis are presented.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

5-24-2010

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2010 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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May 24th, 12:00 AM May 29th, 12:00 AM

Investigation of Shear Strain Amplitude Induced by Railroad Traffic in Soils

San Diego, California

Shear strain amplitude γ is an important quantity in dynamic soil analysis. Usually, a reduction of soil stiffness with increasing shear strain amplitude is observed in laboratory tests. An appropriate invariant of shear strain can be defined which is comparable with shear strains measured in laboratory tests. Usually, shear wave velocity cs is determined from field or laboratory tests and the particle velocity v is obtained from vibration measurements. Afterwards, the shear strain amplitude γ is often estimated from the equation γ = ν / cs, which can be derived for the case of one dimensional wave propagation. Based on numerical analyses with FEM, the validity of the above equation for γ is checked. It can be shown that there is a clear differ-ence between the zone close to the loading area and the zone at a larger distance from the loading area. Experimental results of vibration measurements in the field and the evaluation of dynamic soil properties due to rail traffic are pre-sented and the impact on permanent soil deformations is discussed. Based on the results of the field measurements and the numerical calculations recommendations on the determination of γ for dynamic analysis are presented.