Location

San Diego, California

Session Start Date

3-26-2001

Session End Date

3-31-2001

Abstract

The earthquake that hit Athens, Greece on September 7, 1999 was an unexpected disaster. It originated from a previously unknown seismotectonic structure, at about 18 km to the west of the historical center, and left behind 143 casualties, about 100,000 homeless and 100 totally collapsed buildings. On the other hand, it provided a number of reliable strong motion recordings and well-defined patterns of damage at sites with known geological and geotechnical conditions. Evaluation of this information shows that the very stiff soils of the Athens basin amplified seismic ground motion by an average of 40% compared to nearby outcropping soft rocks. In addition, the 40m in height, 15-3O° inclination cliffs of Kifissos river canyon may have aggravated the seismic motion by an additional 50% on average. Modem seismic codes totally oversee the first of these effects and underscore the second.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-26-2001

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2001 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 31st, 12:00 AM

Review of Soil and Topography Effects in the September 7, 1999 Athens (Greece) Earthquake

San Diego, California

The earthquake that hit Athens, Greece on September 7, 1999 was an unexpected disaster. It originated from a previously unknown seismotectonic structure, at about 18 km to the west of the historical center, and left behind 143 casualties, about 100,000 homeless and 100 totally collapsed buildings. On the other hand, it provided a number of reliable strong motion recordings and well-defined patterns of damage at sites with known geological and geotechnical conditions. Evaluation of this information shows that the very stiff soils of the Athens basin amplified seismic ground motion by an average of 40% compared to nearby outcropping soft rocks. In addition, the 40m in height, 15-3O° inclination cliffs of Kifissos river canyon may have aggravated the seismic motion by an additional 50% on average. Modem seismic codes totally oversee the first of these effects and underscore the second.