Location

San Diego, California

Session Start Date

3-26-2001

Session End Date

3-31-2001

Abstract

The Chi-Chi, Taiwan earthquake with a magnitude of 7.3 occurred on September 21, 1999. It was the largest and most damaging earthquake in Taiwan in a century. It induced extensive geotechnical hazards including landslides, soil liquefaction, foundation failures, and ground movements in central Taiwan, and caused substantial damages to buildings, roadways, bridges, and waterfront structures. Field investigations and studies in geotechnical aspects, including landslides, soil liquefaction, foundations, retaining structures, dams and tunnels, in the affected areas were performed. The results of field explorations and laboratory tests for the study of soil liquefaction and evaluation of the secondary hazard of debris flow are also discussed.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-26-2001

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2001 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

COinS
 
Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 31st, 12:00 AM

Some Geotechnical Aspects of 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan Earthquake

San Diego, California

The Chi-Chi, Taiwan earthquake with a magnitude of 7.3 occurred on September 21, 1999. It was the largest and most damaging earthquake in Taiwan in a century. It induced extensive geotechnical hazards including landslides, soil liquefaction, foundation failures, and ground movements in central Taiwan, and caused substantial damages to buildings, roadways, bridges, and waterfront structures. Field investigations and studies in geotechnical aspects, including landslides, soil liquefaction, foundations, retaining structures, dams and tunnels, in the affected areas were performed. The results of field explorations and laboratory tests for the study of soil liquefaction and evaluation of the secondary hazard of debris flow are also discussed.