Location

San Diego, California

Session Start Date

3-26-2001

Session End Date

3-31-2001

Abstract

Sufficient data currently exist to propose a shear-wave velocity model for the near-surface deposits in southwestern British Columbia. This model has been developed in order to estimate shear-wave velocity profiles where such data are lacking but where the stratigraphy is known, primarily for seismic microzonation mapping. In general, Pleistocene deposits that have been overridden by glaciers have shear-wave velocities greater than 400 m/sec. Consequently, little amplification of ground motion due to soil conditions would be expected in these deposits. However, Late Pleistocene deltaic and glaciomarine deposits that have not been overridden by glaciers, and Holocene deltaic, alluvial, and lacustrine, shoreline and organic deposits have average shear-wave velocities between 75 and 330 m/sec. Where sufficiently thick, these deposits are susceptible to moderate to high amplification of ground motion. In these Late Pleistocene and Holocene deposits, average shear-wave velocity increases with grain size. The data presented here are preliminary, and additional data are required for a reliable characterization of some environments

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-26-2001

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2001 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 31st, 12:00 AM

Development of a Shear Wave Velocity Model of the Near-Surface Deposits of Southwestern British Columbia, Canada

San Diego, California

Sufficient data currently exist to propose a shear-wave velocity model for the near-surface deposits in southwestern British Columbia. This model has been developed in order to estimate shear-wave velocity profiles where such data are lacking but where the stratigraphy is known, primarily for seismic microzonation mapping. In general, Pleistocene deposits that have been overridden by glaciers have shear-wave velocities greater than 400 m/sec. Consequently, little amplification of ground motion due to soil conditions would be expected in these deposits. However, Late Pleistocene deltaic and glaciomarine deposits that have not been overridden by glaciers, and Holocene deltaic, alluvial, and lacustrine, shoreline and organic deposits have average shear-wave velocities between 75 and 330 m/sec. Where sufficiently thick, these deposits are susceptible to moderate to high amplification of ground motion. In these Late Pleistocene and Holocene deposits, average shear-wave velocity increases with grain size. The data presented here are preliminary, and additional data are required for a reliable characterization of some environments