Location

San Diego, California

Session Start Date

3-26-2001

Session End Date

3-31-2001

Abstract

The effects of subsoil conditions on surface ground motion are evaluated in terms of energy spectra. Near-field and far-field strong ground motion recorded during recent destructive earthquakes at nearby rock and soil sites characterized by a comprehensive knowledge of the geotecbnical properties are considered. The study suggests that energy spectra at soil sites are amplified with respect to those on rock sites. The maximum spectral amplification is usually well correlated to the natural periods of the sites. The most striking difference between traditional response spectra and energy spectra is the high soil amplification at longer periods, which is not apparent from the consideration of response spectra only.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-26-2001

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2001 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 31st, 12:00 AM

Characterisation of Site Effects by Means of Energy Spectra

San Diego, California

The effects of subsoil conditions on surface ground motion are evaluated in terms of energy spectra. Near-field and far-field strong ground motion recorded during recent destructive earthquakes at nearby rock and soil sites characterized by a comprehensive knowledge of the geotecbnical properties are considered. The study suggests that energy spectra at soil sites are amplified with respect to those on rock sites. The maximum spectral amplification is usually well correlated to the natural periods of the sites. The most striking difference between traditional response spectra and energy spectra is the high soil amplification at longer periods, which is not apparent from the consideration of response spectra only.