Location

San Diego, California

Session Start Date

3-26-2001

Session End Date

3-31-2001

Abstract

Practical characterization of transient ground-borne vibrations in civil and geotechnical engineering problems is often a difficult and frustrating task. Some modem engineering seismographs now routinely permit the collection of histogram-type data where the peak vibration for a pre-set time interval can be measured and stored for significant time periods. Such data is amenable to analysis utilizing concepts of fractal geometry and self-ordered criticality. Resulting data trends tend to follow power-law relationships that plot as essentially straight lines in log-log space. This application is similar to the Gutenberg-Richter relationship for earthquakes where the relationship between magnitude and frequency is fractal. However, the largest vibrations appear to follow another power-law trend appropriate to characterizing extreme events. Four cases of monitoring apparently random transient ground-borne vibrations are examined using this power-law approach: traffic induced vibrations near the curb of an urban arterial street, an unidentified vibration interfering with a precision machining operation, vibrations induced by vacationing children using the front door of a residence, and vibrations induced by water transport in a pipeline. All cases could be characterized by this approach.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-26-2001

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2001 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 31st, 12:00 AM

Simple Power-Law Characterization of Transient Ground-Borne Vibrations

San Diego, California

Practical characterization of transient ground-borne vibrations in civil and geotechnical engineering problems is often a difficult and frustrating task. Some modem engineering seismographs now routinely permit the collection of histogram-type data where the peak vibration for a pre-set time interval can be measured and stored for significant time periods. Such data is amenable to analysis utilizing concepts of fractal geometry and self-ordered criticality. Resulting data trends tend to follow power-law relationships that plot as essentially straight lines in log-log space. This application is similar to the Gutenberg-Richter relationship for earthquakes where the relationship between magnitude and frequency is fractal. However, the largest vibrations appear to follow another power-law trend appropriate to characterizing extreme events. Four cases of monitoring apparently random transient ground-borne vibrations are examined using this power-law approach: traffic induced vibrations near the curb of an urban arterial street, an unidentified vibration interfering with a precision machining operation, vibrations induced by vacationing children using the front door of a residence, and vibrations induced by water transport in a pipeline. All cases could be characterized by this approach.