Location

San Diego, California

Session Start Date

3-26-2001

Session End Date

3-31-2001

Abstract

The Downhole Freestanding Shear Device is a new, in situ tool for measuring the dynamic properties of cohesive soil deposits. It has been designed and developed to perform cyclic torsional shear tests on freestanding specimens beneath the bottom of a cased borehole, with the goal of measuring local strains on soil which has not been significantly disturbed by the drilling, sampling, or unloading/reloading processes associated with conventional laboratory testing. The research team has completed the device, and is now in the process of validating its performance, first in a laboratory setting. The current paper presents results from the initial tests on soil, illustrating that this new device is capable of measuring shear modulus and damping over a wide range of shear strains, from 10-3 % to nearly 1%.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-26-2001

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2001 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 31st, 12:00 AM

Measurement of Dynamic Properties of Clay Using the Downhole Freestanding Shear Device

San Diego, California

The Downhole Freestanding Shear Device is a new, in situ tool for measuring the dynamic properties of cohesive soil deposits. It has been designed and developed to perform cyclic torsional shear tests on freestanding specimens beneath the bottom of a cased borehole, with the goal of measuring local strains on soil which has not been significantly disturbed by the drilling, sampling, or unloading/reloading processes associated with conventional laboratory testing. The research team has completed the device, and is now in the process of validating its performance, first in a laboratory setting. The current paper presents results from the initial tests on soil, illustrating that this new device is capable of measuring shear modulus and damping over a wide range of shear strains, from 10-3 % to nearly 1%.