Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-2-1995

Session End Date

4-7-1995

Abstract

This paper presents information about subsurface conditions, liquefaction-induced ground movements, and lifeline performance during the 1906 and 1989 earthquakes in San Francisco. Three sites of soil liquefaction and pipeline damage during both earthquakes are evaluated, including the Marina, South of Market, and Mission Creek areas. Important lessons are summarized about the effects of transient lateral shear strains on pipeline performance, post liquefaction consolidation, use of submerged fill thickness as a microzonation technique for predicting liquefaction severity and potential pipeline damage, the relationship between surface manifestations of liquefaction and subsurface geometry of deposits, and factors affecting the magnitude of lateral spread.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-2-1995

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1995 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 2nd, 12:00 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 AM

Lessons Learned from Liquefaction and Lifeline Performance During San Francisco Earthquakes

St. Louis, Missouri

This paper presents information about subsurface conditions, liquefaction-induced ground movements, and lifeline performance during the 1906 and 1989 earthquakes in San Francisco. Three sites of soil liquefaction and pipeline damage during both earthquakes are evaluated, including the Marina, South of Market, and Mission Creek areas. Important lessons are summarized about the effects of transient lateral shear strains on pipeline performance, post liquefaction consolidation, use of submerged fill thickness as a microzonation technique for predicting liquefaction severity and potential pipeline damage, the relationship between surface manifestations of liquefaction and subsurface geometry of deposits, and factors affecting the magnitude of lateral spread.