Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-2-1995

Session End Date

4-7-1995

Abstract

The VELACS project was conducted in order to improve existing methods for the analysis of the consequences of soil liquefaction. The project showed that centrifuge studies are repeatable only under carefully controlled conditions. Most procedures were able to predict the onset of liquefaction in contractive soils, but only effective stress based fully coupled nonlinear procedures were able to predict deformations due to liquefaction· None of the currently available procedures could simulate the behavior of dilative soils adequately. Problems were attributed to improper constitutive model implementation and inadequate calibration. An example to evaluate the behavior of a flow slide observed in a dynamic centrifuge test is presented. Numerical simulations of deformations with a finite deformation formulation showed that the main core of the embankment remained stable after shaking. This is in agreement with the observed behavior.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-2-1995

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1995 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 2nd, 12:00 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 AM

Significance of the VELACS Project to the Solution of Boundary Value Problems in Geotechnical Engineering

St. Louis, Missouri

The VELACS project was conducted in order to improve existing methods for the analysis of the consequences of soil liquefaction. The project showed that centrifuge studies are repeatable only under carefully controlled conditions. Most procedures were able to predict the onset of liquefaction in contractive soils, but only effective stress based fully coupled nonlinear procedures were able to predict deformations due to liquefaction· None of the currently available procedures could simulate the behavior of dilative soils adequately. Problems were attributed to improper constitutive model implementation and inadequate calibration. An example to evaluate the behavior of a flow slide observed in a dynamic centrifuge test is presented. Numerical simulations of deformations with a finite deformation formulation showed that the main core of the embankment remained stable after shaking. This is in agreement with the observed behavior.