Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-2-1995

Session End Date

4-7-1995

Abstract

Many hillside fills located in the Santa Monica, Santa Susana, and San Gabriel Mountains were damaged during the 1994 Northridge Earthquake. While no deaths have been attributed to fill movement, on the order of tens of millions of dollars in property damage was caused by fill movements which typically involved less than about 7.5cm (3 inches) of localized displacement. Some of the damage was induced by permanent deformations of underlying native materials, but most appears to have resulted from ground failure or ground shaking phenomena associated directly with the fill materials. These phenomena include cyclic compaction, lurching, and amplification of shaking within the fills. This paper presents a preliminary summary of the typical distress to fills caused by the Northridge Earthquake, and discusses the probable mechanisms of failure.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-2-1995

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1995 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 2nd, 12:00 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 AM

The Performance of Hillside Fills During the Northridge Earthquake

St. Louis, Missouri

Many hillside fills located in the Santa Monica, Santa Susana, and San Gabriel Mountains were damaged during the 1994 Northridge Earthquake. While no deaths have been attributed to fill movement, on the order of tens of millions of dollars in property damage was caused by fill movements which typically involved less than about 7.5cm (3 inches) of localized displacement. Some of the damage was induced by permanent deformations of underlying native materials, but most appears to have resulted from ground failure or ground shaking phenomena associated directly with the fill materials. These phenomena include cyclic compaction, lurching, and amplification of shaking within the fills. This paper presents a preliminary summary of the typical distress to fills caused by the Northridge Earthquake, and discusses the probable mechanisms of failure.