Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-2-1995

Session End Date

4-7-1995

Abstract

Ground vibrations caused by impact were measured at two sites; one consisting of sand and the other of clay. Measurements were made at various radial distances from the impact location. The impact was produced by a weight falling either on to a plate or on to a rod partly driven into the ground, the latter case simulating pile driving on a small scale. When expressed in terms of scaled energy, the measured peak particle velocities were in reasonable agreement with some of the published data for clay sites but the agreement was poorer for sand sites. Several theoretical expressions were developed for peak particle velocity for both body and Rayleigh waves. All of these expressions yielded calculated velocities that were considerably greater than the values observed. It is considered that at least some of the disagreement could be attributed to energy losses.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-2-1995

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1995 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

COinS
 
Apr 2nd, 12:00 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 AM

Vibrations Caused by Pile Driving

St. Louis, Missouri

Ground vibrations caused by impact were measured at two sites; one consisting of sand and the other of clay. Measurements were made at various radial distances from the impact location. The impact was produced by a weight falling either on to a plate or on to a rod partly driven into the ground, the latter case simulating pile driving on a small scale. When expressed in terms of scaled energy, the measured peak particle velocities were in reasonable agreement with some of the published data for clay sites but the agreement was poorer for sand sites. Several theoretical expressions were developed for peak particle velocity for both body and Rayleigh waves. All of these expressions yielded calculated velocities that were considerably greater than the values observed. It is considered that at least some of the disagreement could be attributed to energy losses.