Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-2-1995

Session End Date

4-7-1995

Abstract

In 1987 the Engineering Geology section of the Delft University of Technology carried out a survey of the SE Netherlands to determine which areas were susceptible to liquefaction based on soil profile, groundwater levels and a Richter scale magnitude 6 earthquake along the principal rift fault through the Netherlands, the Peelrand fault system. The fault system has been active since the Triassic and forms part of the Rhine-North Sea rift system. The last major earthquake along the Peelrand fault was in 1933. Recently, in 1992, A 5.8 magnitude earthquake occurred at Roermond, near to the Dutch-German border. Though damage resulting from the earthquake was limited, remedial works to structures amounted to US$ 50 million in the Netherlands. The paper reviews geotechnical investigations associated with the earthquake carried out in the Netherlands. Much of the damage is attributed to liquefaction; excess pore pressures resulting from the earthquake caused sand vent eruptions, river-dyke failures and slope failures. Comparisons are made between the predictions of 1987 and that which occurred in 1992. Site investigation works are recording geotechnical and building data so as to allow for correlations between extents of damage, ground geotechnical profiles and building design. Models for liquefaction are reviewed to describe the slope failure as well as the sand vent phenomena. Densification of subsoil has been inferred from CPTs taken before and after the earthquake for some sites. Pile foundation damage has been investigated for buildings in Roermond for which their susceptibility to earthquake lateral forces in terms of stiffness and pile head working load is given.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-2-1995

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1995 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 2nd, 12:00 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 AM

Review of Geotechnical Investigations Resulting from the Roermond April 13, 1992 Earthquake

St. Louis, Missouri

In 1987 the Engineering Geology section of the Delft University of Technology carried out a survey of the SE Netherlands to determine which areas were susceptible to liquefaction based on soil profile, groundwater levels and a Richter scale magnitude 6 earthquake along the principal rift fault through the Netherlands, the Peelrand fault system. The fault system has been active since the Triassic and forms part of the Rhine-North Sea rift system. The last major earthquake along the Peelrand fault was in 1933. Recently, in 1992, A 5.8 magnitude earthquake occurred at Roermond, near to the Dutch-German border. Though damage resulting from the earthquake was limited, remedial works to structures amounted to US$ 50 million in the Netherlands. The paper reviews geotechnical investigations associated with the earthquake carried out in the Netherlands. Much of the damage is attributed to liquefaction; excess pore pressures resulting from the earthquake caused sand vent eruptions, river-dyke failures and slope failures. Comparisons are made between the predictions of 1987 and that which occurred in 1992. Site investigation works are recording geotechnical and building data so as to allow for correlations between extents of damage, ground geotechnical profiles and building design. Models for liquefaction are reviewed to describe the slope failure as well as the sand vent phenomena. Densification of subsoil has been inferred from CPTs taken before and after the earthquake for some sites. Pile foundation damage has been investigated for buildings in Roermond for which their susceptibility to earthquake lateral forces in terms of stiffness and pile head working load is given.