Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-2-1995

Session End Date

4-7-1995

Abstract

In the majority of the current building codes, the shape of a design spectrum is defined by considering only the local soil conditions. This paper examines the validity of this simplification. In particular, it is shown how effects of "deep soil" or "rock soil" conditions on uniform probability site specific spectra can be simulated by varying the geological site conditions (depth of sediments) and the distance from the fault. On the basis of the results presented in the paper and similar results from earlier papers considering the effects of the choice of the geometry of the model fault and the assumed rupture area, as well as the seismic moment rate, the maximum magnitude, the b-value, and the confidence of the prediction, it is concluded that the shapes of design spectra should not be determined only on the basis of the local soil conditions.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-2-1995

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1995 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 2nd, 12:00 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 AM

Uniform Probability Response Spectra for Selecting Site Specific Design Motions

St. Louis, Missouri

In the majority of the current building codes, the shape of a design spectrum is defined by considering only the local soil conditions. This paper examines the validity of this simplification. In particular, it is shown how effects of "deep soil" or "rock soil" conditions on uniform probability site specific spectra can be simulated by varying the geological site conditions (depth of sediments) and the distance from the fault. On the basis of the results presented in the paper and similar results from earlier papers considering the effects of the choice of the geometry of the model fault and the assumed rupture area, as well as the seismic moment rate, the maximum magnitude, the b-value, and the confidence of the prediction, it is concluded that the shapes of design spectra should not be determined only on the basis of the local soil conditions.