Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-2-1995

Session End Date

4-7-1995

Abstract

This paper presents a simplified method for estimating the liquefaction-induced settlements of saturated sand deposits. Based on several kinds of undrained cyclic loading tests followed by drained reconsolidation under the different boundary constraint conditions of non-zero and zero lateral strains for different sands, it has been found that there exists a good correlation between the rates of change in 'surplus void ratio' of sand (difference between initial void ratio and minimum void ratio) after both complete and incomplete liquefaction, and the maximum shear strain induced during cyclic loading. The predicted results have been compared favorably with experimental observations of shake table tests on saturated model sand deposits.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-2-1995

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1995 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 2nd, 12:00 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 AM

Liquefaction-Induced Settlements in Sand Deposits

St. Louis, Missouri

This paper presents a simplified method for estimating the liquefaction-induced settlements of saturated sand deposits. Based on several kinds of undrained cyclic loading tests followed by drained reconsolidation under the different boundary constraint conditions of non-zero and zero lateral strains for different sands, it has been found that there exists a good correlation between the rates of change in 'surplus void ratio' of sand (difference between initial void ratio and minimum void ratio) after both complete and incomplete liquefaction, and the maximum shear strain induced during cyclic loading. The predicted results have been compared favorably with experimental observations of shake table tests on saturated model sand deposits.