Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-2-1995

Session End Date

4-7-1995

Abstract

The method adopted for the evaluation of the soil liquefaction potential in the Messina Straits, Italy, is presented and the results are discussed. The study was carried out for the design of three submerged floating tunnels linking Sicily to the Italian mainland. The method is based on a combined approach where field measurements are used to partly re-create the original soil fabric in the specimens for cyclic laboratory tests. The method is suitable for offshore investigations where recovery of truly undisturbed samples is hardly possible. The results show that in this way a much higher resistance to liquefaction is predicted than from conventional laboratory tests. The results of indirect methods based only on CPT records or shear wave velocity measurements in the field are presented first, and their limitations that led to the selection of an improved laboratory testing program are outlined.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-2-1995

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1995 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

COinS
 
Apr 2nd, 12:00 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 AM

Liquefaction Potential Evaluation for the Messina Straits Crossing by Field and Laboratory Testing

St. Louis, Missouri

The method adopted for the evaluation of the soil liquefaction potential in the Messina Straits, Italy, is presented and the results are discussed. The study was carried out for the design of three submerged floating tunnels linking Sicily to the Italian mainland. The method is based on a combined approach where field measurements are used to partly re-create the original soil fabric in the specimens for cyclic laboratory tests. The method is suitable for offshore investigations where recovery of truly undisturbed samples is hardly possible. The results show that in this way a much higher resistance to liquefaction is predicted than from conventional laboratory tests. The results of indirect methods based only on CPT records or shear wave velocity measurements in the field are presented first, and their limitations that led to the selection of an improved laboratory testing program are outlined.