Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-2-1995

Session End Date

4-7-1995

Abstract

Recent exploratory work by the authors indicated the feasibility of relating the development of the pore water pressure leading to liquefaction of soils subjected to earthquake loading to the amount of unit energy imparted to the soil during the dynamic motion. This research also showed that regardless of the mode of stress application, sinusoidal or random, the unit energy needed to initiate liquefaction is nearly constant for a given effective confining stress and a specific relative density, demonstrating that the unit energy is independent of the shear strain amplitude. Data obtained during torsional shear tests on a given soil made possible the development of relationships between the unit energy required for liquefaction (as the dependent variable) and the effective confining pressure and the relative density (as the independent variables). This paper examines the effect of grain size, and in particular that of the amount of silt contained in the liquefiable soil, on the amount of unit energy required for liquefaction. The soils selected for study included soils that liquefied during the recent Northridge Earthquake (Lower San Fernando Valley Dam). Understanding the effect of grain size on the amount of unit energy needed to initiate liquefaction is fundamental if an energy-based method to determine the liquefaction potential of a soil deposit is to implemented.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-2-1995

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1995 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Effect of the Grain Size on the Energy per Unit Volume at the Onset of Liquefaction

St. Louis, Missouri

Recent exploratory work by the authors indicated the feasibility of relating the development of the pore water pressure leading to liquefaction of soils subjected to earthquake loading to the amount of unit energy imparted to the soil during the dynamic motion. This research also showed that regardless of the mode of stress application, sinusoidal or random, the unit energy needed to initiate liquefaction is nearly constant for a given effective confining stress and a specific relative density, demonstrating that the unit energy is independent of the shear strain amplitude. Data obtained during torsional shear tests on a given soil made possible the development of relationships between the unit energy required for liquefaction (as the dependent variable) and the effective confining pressure and the relative density (as the independent variables). This paper examines the effect of grain size, and in particular that of the amount of silt contained in the liquefiable soil, on the amount of unit energy required for liquefaction. The soils selected for study included soils that liquefied during the recent Northridge Earthquake (Lower San Fernando Valley Dam). Understanding the effect of grain size on the amount of unit energy needed to initiate liquefaction is fundamental if an energy-based method to determine the liquefaction potential of a soil deposit is to implemented.