Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-2-1995

Session End Date

4-7-1995

Abstract

The stress-strain relationships of sand after liquefaction were studied by conducting torsional shear tests under several conditions. A prescribed number of cyclic loadings were applied first, then a monotonic loading was applied in undrained condition. The stress-strain relationships during the monotonic loading are discussed. The stress-strain curves were affected by excess pore pressure ratio, soil density, confining pressure and severity of liquefaction. The shear modulus decreased to less than 111000 due to liquefaction, and shear strain increased more than 10% with very low stress in the liquefied specimen. And, there exists a so called "reference strain at resistance transformation γL" which increases with decreases in soil density and severity of liquefaction.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-2-1995

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1995 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

COinS
 
Apr 2nd, 12:00 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 AM

Stress-Strain Relationships of Sand after Liquefaction

St. Louis, Missouri

The stress-strain relationships of sand after liquefaction were studied by conducting torsional shear tests under several conditions. A prescribed number of cyclic loadings were applied first, then a monotonic loading was applied in undrained condition. The stress-strain relationships during the monotonic loading are discussed. The stress-strain curves were affected by excess pore pressure ratio, soil density, confining pressure and severity of liquefaction. The shear modulus decreased to less than 111000 due to liquefaction, and shear strain increased more than 10% with very low stress in the liquefied specimen. And, there exists a so called "reference strain at resistance transformation γL" which increases with decreases in soil density and severity of liquefaction.