Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-2-1995

Session End Date

4-7-1995

Abstract

Larger scale dynamic centrifuge modeling has been used to examine the behavior of a soilpile-structure system during earthquake-induced liquefaction. The model consisting of a 3 x 3-pile supported structure and a saturated sand deposit was constructed in a laminar container with the inside dimensions of 74-cm length, 50-cm height and 34-cm width. Test results show that liquefaction occurred only within a finite zone in the saturated sand deposit subjected to a strong input shaking that corresponds to a maximum earthquake acceleration of 0.3 g induced probably in actual ground, which agrees well with the results of earthquake damage investigation; moreover, larger induced bending strains of foundation piles were concentrated near the interface between liquefied and non-liquefied soil layers. This concentration of bending strain may be attributed to remarkable reduction in shear resistance of liquefied soil layer relat1ve to that of non-l1quef1ed so1l layer.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-2-1995

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1995 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Soil-Pile-Structure during Liquefaction on Centrifuge

St. Louis, Missouri

Larger scale dynamic centrifuge modeling has been used to examine the behavior of a soilpile-structure system during earthquake-induced liquefaction. The model consisting of a 3 x 3-pile supported structure and a saturated sand deposit was constructed in a laminar container with the inside dimensions of 74-cm length, 50-cm height and 34-cm width. Test results show that liquefaction occurred only within a finite zone in the saturated sand deposit subjected to a strong input shaking that corresponds to a maximum earthquake acceleration of 0.3 g induced probably in actual ground, which agrees well with the results of earthquake damage investigation; moreover, larger induced bending strains of foundation piles were concentrated near the interface between liquefied and non-liquefied soil layers. This concentration of bending strain may be attributed to remarkable reduction in shear resistance of liquefied soil layer relat1ve to that of non-l1quef1ed so1l layer.