Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-2-1995

Session End Date

4-7-1995

Abstract

Soil response under dynamic loading has been modeled using linear-viscoelasticity for many decades. The definitions of various damping-related quantities are reviewed and the implications of their use in the analysis of continuous masses are given. The selection of an equivalent damping ratio as a parameter for modeling damping in most geotechnical applications is discussed together with the assumptions underlying the selection procedure. The techniques for damping determination using laboratory testing are summarized, emphasizing the influence that factors such as apparatus type, loading path, rate of loading, and strain level have on the measurement. Disturbance effects in samples recovered from the ground are discussed and contrasted with the advantages and disadvantages of emerging techniques for in-situ determination of damping. Finally, the paper addresses the importance of selecting damping values for different types of analyses in earthquake geotechnical engineering and of correctly accounting for radiation damping.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-2-1995

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1995 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 2nd, 12:00 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 AM

Soil Damping and Its Use in Dynamic Analyses

St. Louis, Missouri

Soil response under dynamic loading has been modeled using linear-viscoelasticity for many decades. The definitions of various damping-related quantities are reviewed and the implications of their use in the analysis of continuous masses are given. The selection of an equivalent damping ratio as a parameter for modeling damping in most geotechnical applications is discussed together with the assumptions underlying the selection procedure. The techniques for damping determination using laboratory testing are summarized, emphasizing the influence that factors such as apparatus type, loading path, rate of loading, and strain level have on the measurement. Disturbance effects in samples recovered from the ground are discussed and contrasted with the advantages and disadvantages of emerging techniques for in-situ determination of damping. Finally, the paper addresses the importance of selecting damping values for different types of analyses in earthquake geotechnical engineering and of correctly accounting for radiation damping.