Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-2-1995

Session End Date

4-7-1995

Abstract

High strain rate tests were conducted on specimens of three different sands at saturations varying from dry to 100% using a Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar. Compacted specimens were subjected to undrained uniaxial confined compression at approximate strain rates of 1000/s and 2000/s by an approximate square wave input of 225 MPa with a pulse length of 250 µs. The stress-strain curves show an initially steep portion which appears to be strain rate independent. Beyond this, slopes are about the same up to the lock-up strain, an abrupt change in slope, indicating an increase in stiffness. The effect of increasing saturation is to increase the slope or stiffness of the material. Results suggest that the soil skeleton dominates the response up to lock-up and the water phase dominates the response beyond.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-2-1995

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1995 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 2nd, 12:00 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 AM

High Strain Rate Testing of Unsaturated Sands Using a Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar

St. Louis, Missouri

High strain rate tests were conducted on specimens of three different sands at saturations varying from dry to 100% using a Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar. Compacted specimens were subjected to undrained uniaxial confined compression at approximate strain rates of 1000/s and 2000/s by an approximate square wave input of 225 MPa with a pulse length of 250 µs. The stress-strain curves show an initially steep portion which appears to be strain rate independent. Beyond this, slopes are about the same up to the lock-up strain, an abrupt change in slope, indicating an increase in stiffness. The effect of increasing saturation is to increase the slope or stiffness of the material. Results suggest that the soil skeleton dominates the response up to lock-up and the water phase dominates the response beyond.