Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-11-1991

Session End Date

3-15-1991

Abstract

Theoretical methods for estimating the dynamic response and predicting the performance of modern rockfill dams subjected to strong earthquake shaking are reviewed. The focus is on methods accounting for nonlinear material behavior, for 3-Dimensional canyon geometry, and asynchronous base excitation. It is shown that both strong nonlinearities and lack of coherence in the seismic excitation tend to reduce the magnitude of the deleterious "whip-lash" effect computed for tall dams built in rigid-wall narrow canyons. Particular emphasis is accorded to Concrete-Faced Rockfill dams and a case study involving an actually designed dam in a narrow canyon points to some potential problems and suggests some desirable modifications. In the light of theoretical results the paper concludes with a discussion on design rules and defensive measures that would lead to robust design schemes of Earth-Core and Concrete Faced Rockfill dams.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-11-1991

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1991 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Aspects of Seismic Analysis and Design of Rockfill Dams

St. Louis, Missouri

Theoretical methods for estimating the dynamic response and predicting the performance of modern rockfill dams subjected to strong earthquake shaking are reviewed. The focus is on methods accounting for nonlinear material behavior, for 3-Dimensional canyon geometry, and asynchronous base excitation. It is shown that both strong nonlinearities and lack of coherence in the seismic excitation tend to reduce the magnitude of the deleterious "whip-lash" effect computed for tall dams built in rigid-wall narrow canyons. Particular emphasis is accorded to Concrete-Faced Rockfill dams and a case study involving an actually designed dam in a narrow canyon points to some potential problems and suggests some desirable modifications. In the light of theoretical results the paper concludes with a discussion on design rules and defensive measures that would lead to robust design schemes of Earth-Core and Concrete Faced Rockfill dams.