Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-11-1991

Session End Date

3-15-1991

Abstract

This paper evaluates the liquefaction potential of sands within the Marina District. Three types of underlying potentially liquefiable soil deposits are studied: (A) Hydraulic fill, (B) Artificial fill, and (C) Strawberry Island and other modern beach deposits. A liquefaction analysis for each of these deposits is conducted. It is suggested that a Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) of approximately 0.1g is needed in the Marina District to initiate liquefaction. Relations between PGA and thickness of liquefiable soil, as well as potential surface settlement are presented. These relationships are useful for the study of expected performance of the Marina District in future earthquakes. The results can also be used to evaluate possible ground modification methods, utility design, or structural retrofit designs.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-11-1991

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1991 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 11th, 12:00 AM Mar 15th, 12:00 AM

Liquefaction and Surface Settlement in the Marina District

St. Louis, Missouri

This paper evaluates the liquefaction potential of sands within the Marina District. Three types of underlying potentially liquefiable soil deposits are studied: (A) Hydraulic fill, (B) Artificial fill, and (C) Strawberry Island and other modern beach deposits. A liquefaction analysis for each of these deposits is conducted. It is suggested that a Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) of approximately 0.1g is needed in the Marina District to initiate liquefaction. Relations between PGA and thickness of liquefiable soil, as well as potential surface settlement are presented. These relationships are useful for the study of expected performance of the Marina District in future earthquakes. The results can also be used to evaluate possible ground modification methods, utility design, or structural retrofit designs.