Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-11-1991

Session End Date

3-15-1991

Abstract

The paper presents and analyzes the observations of the sand boils that emerged in the Marina District after the Loma Prieta Earthquake of October 17, 1989. The sand boils left behind by liquefaction revealed an old lagoon, the periphery of which had experienced severe damage in the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. The buildings in the Marina District were damaged primarily as the liquefied ground spread laterally along the shoreline of the 1906 lagoon that was filled to host the 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco. The present work infers that the sand boils are not random phenomena but instrumental sensors to understand the ground failure induced by liquefaction.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-11-1991

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1991 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

COinS
 
Mar 11th, 12:00 AM Mar 15th, 12:00 AM

The Liquefaction Sand Boils in the San Francisco Marina District During the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake

St. Louis, Missouri

The paper presents and analyzes the observations of the sand boils that emerged in the Marina District after the Loma Prieta Earthquake of October 17, 1989. The sand boils left behind by liquefaction revealed an old lagoon, the periphery of which had experienced severe damage in the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. The buildings in the Marina District were damaged primarily as the liquefied ground spread laterally along the shoreline of the 1906 lagoon that was filled to host the 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco. The present work infers that the sand boils are not random phenomena but instrumental sensors to understand the ground failure induced by liquefaction.