Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-11-1991

Session End Date

3-15-1991

Abstract

This paper presents a new method that predicts the vibrational effects on existing soil, building and equipment from a designed machine foundation when it will be installed at a specific site. The method requires development of certain experimental data at an industrial site and subsequent computerized data reduction. The results are complete vibro-records at the locations of interest. The basic prerequisite of the suggested method is an experimental determining of impulse responses of soil and structures. The use of this response gives to an engineer a chance to consider heterogeneity and multiformity of soil properties. The accepted assumptions have been experimentally based. The general set-up of the way of predicting and the examples of predicting soil vibration has been described. The application of the suggested method gives the possibility of a determination of safe distances from machine foundations to sensitive units.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-11-1991

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1991 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 11th, 12:00 AM Mar 15th, 12:00 AM

Predicting Vibrations of Soil and Buildings Excited by Machine Foundations Under Dynamic Loads

St. Louis, Missouri

This paper presents a new method that predicts the vibrational effects on existing soil, building and equipment from a designed machine foundation when it will be installed at a specific site. The method requires development of certain experimental data at an industrial site and subsequent computerized data reduction. The results are complete vibro-records at the locations of interest. The basic prerequisite of the suggested method is an experimental determining of impulse responses of soil and structures. The use of this response gives to an engineer a chance to consider heterogeneity and multiformity of soil properties. The accepted assumptions have been experimentally based. The general set-up of the way of predicting and the examples of predicting soil vibration has been described. The application of the suggested method gives the possibility of a determination of safe distances from machine foundations to sensitive units.