Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-11-1991

Session End Date

3-15-1991

Abstract

This paper describes a field evaluation of a technique for detecting leaks in large above ground storage tanks. The technique detects leaking tank products in the foundation material by sensing anomalies in seismic boundary waves transmitted across the tank bottom. The evaluation consisted of three steps: (1) investigation of surface (Rayleigh) wave anomalies due to surface soil saturation in linear arrays; (2) evaluation of boundary waves propagated across the bottom of typical tanks; and (3) a surface (Rayleigh) wave experiment using tomography to locate velocity changes due to surface soil saturation. The results of these tests have shown that boundary waves can be easily propagated along a tank bottom and received by conventional geophones, and that soil saturation anomalies can be detected and located using boundary waves and tomographic reconstruction.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-11-1991

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1991 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 11th, 12:00 AM Mar 15th, 12:00 AM

Leak Detection In Large Storage Tanks Using Seismic Boundary Waves

St. Louis, Missouri

This paper describes a field evaluation of a technique for detecting leaks in large above ground storage tanks. The technique detects leaking tank products in the foundation material by sensing anomalies in seismic boundary waves transmitted across the tank bottom. The evaluation consisted of three steps: (1) investigation of surface (Rayleigh) wave anomalies due to surface soil saturation in linear arrays; (2) evaluation of boundary waves propagated across the bottom of typical tanks; and (3) a surface (Rayleigh) wave experiment using tomography to locate velocity changes due to surface soil saturation. The results of these tests have shown that boundary waves can be easily propagated along a tank bottom and received by conventional geophones, and that soil saturation anomalies can be detected and located using boundary waves and tomographic reconstruction.