Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-11-1991

Session End Date

3-15-1991

Abstract

The method of microtremors has been recently applied for the microzonation of the town of alamata, in southern Greece. Results from this study are evaluated in comparison with predictions of seismic ground response obtained by 1-D wave propagation analyses. Predominant periods of microtremor are considerably lower than estimated fundamental ground periods. It is shown that a small part of the observed differences in due to soil non-linearity in connection with the small strain amplitudes induced by microtremors. The largest part appears to be due to geologic factors, namely the existence of rigid soil layers within the soft soil above the seismic bedrock of the area. These layers act as a ”pseudo" seismic bedrock and may consequently reduce the predominant period of microtremors relative to that of earthquake motions.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-11-1991

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1991 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 11th, 12:00 AM Mar 15th, 12:00 AM

Effect of Local Soil Stratigraphy on Microtremor Measurements

St. Louis, Missouri

The method of microtremors has been recently applied for the microzonation of the town of alamata, in southern Greece. Results from this study are evaluated in comparison with predictions of seismic ground response obtained by 1-D wave propagation analyses. Predominant periods of microtremor are considerably lower than estimated fundamental ground periods. It is shown that a small part of the observed differences in due to soil non-linearity in connection with the small strain amplitudes induced by microtremors. The largest part appears to be due to geologic factors, namely the existence of rigid soil layers within the soft soil above the seismic bedrock of the area. These layers act as a ”pseudo" seismic bedrock and may consequently reduce the predominant period of microtremors relative to that of earthquake motions.