Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-11-1991

Session End Date

3-15-1991

Abstract

The seismic stability of natural slopes in clayey materials is a subject about which much uncertainty still exists. Therefore, selection of the method for the seismic slope stability analysis is an important part of solving the problem. In this paper the basic elements of the pseudo-static method, the sliding block method and the Ishihara's method are discussed. A case history of seismic stability analysis of an Adriatic coast flysch slope has been employed to evaluate the applicability and reliability of these methods. The slope is treated as an infinite slope. Although no definitive conclusions can be drawn from a single case history study, results may be used m future evaluations of seismic stability of similar slopes in cohesive materials.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-11-1991

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1991 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 11th, 12:00 AM Mar 15th, 12:00 AM

Selection of Method for Seismic Slope Stability Analysis

St. Louis, Missouri

The seismic stability of natural slopes in clayey materials is a subject about which much uncertainty still exists. Therefore, selection of the method for the seismic slope stability analysis is an important part of solving the problem. In this paper the basic elements of the pseudo-static method, the sliding block method and the Ishihara's method are discussed. A case history of seismic stability analysis of an Adriatic coast flysch slope has been employed to evaluate the applicability and reliability of these methods. The slope is treated as an infinite slope. Although no definitive conclusions can be drawn from a single case history study, results may be used m future evaluations of seismic stability of similar slopes in cohesive materials.