Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-11-1991

Session End Date

3-15-1991

Abstract

Slope stability problems involving colluvia on shale bedrock are common in the Greater Cincinnati Area. The behavior of these hillslopes during earthquakes is, however, not known. This gives cause to speculation whether they are vulnerable to earthquake vibrations. In order to verify the response of these slopes to earthquake induced ground motions, representative composite clay shale samples obtained from a typical colluvial hillside in Cincinnati were tested in a cyclic direct shear apparatus which was attached to a load cell from the MTS piston actuator. The samples were initially consolidated under a selected normal pressure and then sheared until residual strength was developed. Pulsating strains were then superimposed simulating seismic excitation and the response was recorded by digital equipment. The results from the laboratory experiments were used in the analysis of "infinite colluvial slopes" for a wide variety of assumed conditions.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-11-1991

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1991 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 11th, 12:00 AM Mar 15th, 12:00 AM

Seismic Stability of Hillslopes in Greater Cincinnati Area

St. Louis, Missouri

Slope stability problems involving colluvia on shale bedrock are common in the Greater Cincinnati Area. The behavior of these hillslopes during earthquakes is, however, not known. This gives cause to speculation whether they are vulnerable to earthquake vibrations. In order to verify the response of these slopes to earthquake induced ground motions, representative composite clay shale samples obtained from a typical colluvial hillside in Cincinnati were tested in a cyclic direct shear apparatus which was attached to a load cell from the MTS piston actuator. The samples were initially consolidated under a selected normal pressure and then sheared until residual strength was developed. Pulsating strains were then superimposed simulating seismic excitation and the response was recorded by digital equipment. The results from the laboratory experiments were used in the analysis of "infinite colluvial slopes" for a wide variety of assumed conditions.