Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-11-1991

Session End Date

3-15-1991

Abstract

Earthquake induced liquefaction of sediment stored behind dams can give rise to high uplift pressures which could endanger their safety. The uplift pressures depend upon the permeability and compressibility of both the sediment and the foundation and are controlled by Biot's equation. Uplift pressures are computed for a single dam and foundation with a range of properties. The results show that for the conditions analyzed, the uplift pressures are largely controlled by the foundation permeability with the largest uplift pressures occurring for the highest foundation permeability. The possibility of liquefied sediment flowing into fissures in the foundation rock is also considered and can result in much higher predicted uplift forces. This condition is only likely to occur for a foundation rock of high permeability.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-11-1991

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1991 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

COinS
 
Mar 11th, 12:00 AM Mar 15th, 12:00 AM

Effects of Earthquake Induced Liquefaction of Sediments Stored Behind Concrete Dams

St. Louis, Missouri

Earthquake induced liquefaction of sediment stored behind dams can give rise to high uplift pressures which could endanger their safety. The uplift pressures depend upon the permeability and compressibility of both the sediment and the foundation and are controlled by Biot's equation. Uplift pressures are computed for a single dam and foundation with a range of properties. The results show that for the conditions analyzed, the uplift pressures are largely controlled by the foundation permeability with the largest uplift pressures occurring for the highest foundation permeability. The possibility of liquefied sediment flowing into fissures in the foundation rock is also considered and can result in much higher predicted uplift forces. This condition is only likely to occur for a foundation rock of high permeability.