Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-11-1991

Session End Date

3-15-1991

Abstract

A simplified method is presented for evaluating liquefaction potential of sand deposits using shear wave velocity. Effectiveness of the proposed method is evaluated through field tests at 17 sites in Niigata city where field performance during the 1964 Niigata earthquake is known. A modified version of steady state Rayleigh wave method is used in which the amplitude ratio between vertical and horizontal ground surface motions can be measured in addition to the phase velocity. Based on the measured phase velocity vs. wavelength relationship, shear wave velocity profile is determined using an inverse analysis. The liquefaction potential of each site is then evaluated using the shear wave velocity. The estimated results are reasonably consistent with the actual field behavior during the earthquake, indicating that the proposed method is effective.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-11-1991

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1991 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 11th, 12:00 AM Mar 15th, 12:00 AM

Liquefaction Potential Evaluation Based on Rayleigh Wave Investigation and Its Comparison with Field Behavior

St. Louis, Missouri

A simplified method is presented for evaluating liquefaction potential of sand deposits using shear wave velocity. Effectiveness of the proposed method is evaluated through field tests at 17 sites in Niigata city where field performance during the 1964 Niigata earthquake is known. A modified version of steady state Rayleigh wave method is used in which the amplitude ratio between vertical and horizontal ground surface motions can be measured in addition to the phase velocity. Based on the measured phase velocity vs. wavelength relationship, shear wave velocity profile is determined using an inverse analysis. The liquefaction potential of each site is then evaluated using the shear wave velocity. The estimated results are reasonably consistent with the actual field behavior during the earthquake, indicating that the proposed method is effective.