Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-11-1991

Session End Date

3-15-1991

Abstract

A simplified method of slope stability analysis is presented for upstream-constructed coal tailings dams subjected to earthquake shaking. The method employs a conventional method of slices approach, in which dynamic loads are represented as psuedostatic forces applied to each slice. Excess pore water pressures are estimated from cyclic triaxial tests performed on specimens of fine coal refuse. Cyclic triaxial test results are presented for fine coal refuse materials from six sites in the western Appalachian region. Measured excess pore water pressure values appear to be influenced by fine coal processing procedures, although material plasticity and grain characteristics are also important. Additional studies are ongoing.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-11-1991

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1991 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 11th, 12:00 AM Mar 15th, 12:00 AM

Dynamic Properties of Fine-Grained Coal Refuse

St. Louis, Missouri

A simplified method of slope stability analysis is presented for upstream-constructed coal tailings dams subjected to earthquake shaking. The method employs a conventional method of slices approach, in which dynamic loads are represented as psuedostatic forces applied to each slice. Excess pore water pressures are estimated from cyclic triaxial tests performed on specimens of fine coal refuse. Cyclic triaxial test results are presented for fine coal refuse materials from six sites in the western Appalachian region. Measured excess pore water pressure values appear to be influenced by fine coal processing procedures, although material plasticity and grain characteristics are also important. Additional studies are ongoing.