Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-26-1981

Session End Date

5-3-1981

Abstract

The geotechnical aspects of three earthquakes that struck the city of Thessaloniki, Greece, on May 25, June 20 and July 4, 1978 are presented. General background information on the observed damage, seismic history and geology of the area is followed by detailed description of soil profiles, structural characteristics and accelerograms of ground motions recorded at three sites. Acceleration spectra are then examined and compared in order to assess the degree to which local and regional geology and soil-structure interaction affected the recorded motion. Finally, the possibility of liquefaction having taken place in a 6 m-thick saturated loose layer of silty sand, under the monumental 'White Tower', is investigated. Conclusions are drawn in the light of the current state-of-art of assessing liquefaction potential of soils.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

First Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-26-1981

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1981 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 26th, 12:00 AM May 3rd, 12:00 AM

Local Soil Effects and Liquefaction in the 1978 Thessaloniki Earthquakes

St. Louis, Missouri

The geotechnical aspects of three earthquakes that struck the city of Thessaloniki, Greece, on May 25, June 20 and July 4, 1978 are presented. General background information on the observed damage, seismic history and geology of the area is followed by detailed description of soil profiles, structural characteristics and accelerograms of ground motions recorded at three sites. Acceleration spectra are then examined and compared in order to assess the degree to which local and regional geology and soil-structure interaction affected the recorded motion. Finally, the possibility of liquefaction having taken place in a 6 m-thick saturated loose layer of silty sand, under the monumental 'White Tower', is investigated. Conclusions are drawn in the light of the current state-of-art of assessing liquefaction potential of soils.