Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-26-1981

Session End Date

5-3-1981

Abstract

Apparent seismic wave velocities are studied by comparing the stress results obtained by a computer simulation with those obtained by a commonly used simplified engineering model. Two earth models with significantly different surface layers and two focal depths of energy release are used. The results from all four cases studied show that the apparent wave velocity at the free surface is determined by the properties of the material at depth where energy is released. A secondary, yet significant conclusion is the fact that the simplified plane wave propagation solution is a good predictor of the strains/stresses due to seismic waves, provided the appropriate apparent wave velocities are used.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

First Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-26-1981

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1981 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 26th, 12:00 AM May 3rd, 12:00 AM

Studies of Apparent Seismic Wave Velocity

St. Louis, Missouri

Apparent seismic wave velocities are studied by comparing the stress results obtained by a computer simulation with those obtained by a commonly used simplified engineering model. Two earth models with significantly different surface layers and two focal depths of energy release are used. The results from all four cases studied show that the apparent wave velocity at the free surface is determined by the properties of the material at depth where energy is released. A secondary, yet significant conclusion is the fact that the simplified plane wave propagation solution is a good predictor of the strains/stresses due to seismic waves, provided the appropriate apparent wave velocities are used.