Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-26-1981

Session End Date

5-3-1981

Abstract

An experimental and theoretical study has been carried out to examine the effects of vibration frequency and amplitude as well as magnitude of static applied load on the uplift capacity of piles driven into a sandy soil. The theoretical solution was developed using a lumped parameter model with viscous damping. The results, both theoretical and experimental, indicate that the displacement amplitude required to cause uplift failure of the pile, decreases as the vibration frequency increases. This trend was shown to be significantly dependent upon the natural frequency of the pile-soil system and to a lesser degree, upon the damping ratio. At low vibration frequencies observed and calculated vibration amplitudes required to cause uplift failure were found to be in approximate agreement. The application of a surcharge pressure to the sand surface was found experimentally to increase the uplift capacity of the pile under vibration.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

First Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-26-1981

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1981 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 26th, 12:00 AM May 3rd, 12:00 AM

Effect of Vibration on Pile Uplift Capacity

St. Louis, Missouri

An experimental and theoretical study has been carried out to examine the effects of vibration frequency and amplitude as well as magnitude of static applied load on the uplift capacity of piles driven into a sandy soil. The theoretical solution was developed using a lumped parameter model with viscous damping. The results, both theoretical and experimental, indicate that the displacement amplitude required to cause uplift failure of the pile, decreases as the vibration frequency increases. This trend was shown to be significantly dependent upon the natural frequency of the pile-soil system and to a lesser degree, upon the damping ratio. At low vibration frequencies observed and calculated vibration amplitudes required to cause uplift failure were found to be in approximate agreement. The application of a surcharge pressure to the sand surface was found experimentally to increase the uplift capacity of the pile under vibration.