Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-26-1981

Session End Date

5-3-1981

Abstract

Most of our understandin9 of the liquefaction phenomenon has come from laboratory tests. It would be desirable to express liquefaction resistance in terms of a parameter which can be measured both in the laboratory and in the field. It is proposed that the dilation angle or expansion rate of the sand is such a parameter. It is readily measured in the laboratory from drained simple shear or triaxial tests and in the field from self boring pressuremeter tests. Based on laboratory tests on Ottawa sand a chart is presented for estimating the liquefaction resistance of saturated sands in terms of dilation angle in addition to the usual parameters relative density and blow count. When the chart was used in conjunction with pressuremeter tests, a conservative estimate of liquefaction resistance of a hydraulic fill dam was obtained.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

First Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-26-1981

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1981 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 26th, 12:00 AM May 3rd, 12:00 AM

Dilation Angle and Liquefaction Potential

St. Louis, Missouri

Most of our understandin9 of the liquefaction phenomenon has come from laboratory tests. It would be desirable to express liquefaction resistance in terms of a parameter which can be measured both in the laboratory and in the field. It is proposed that the dilation angle or expansion rate of the sand is such a parameter. It is readily measured in the laboratory from drained simple shear or triaxial tests and in the field from self boring pressuremeter tests. Based on laboratory tests on Ottawa sand a chart is presented for estimating the liquefaction resistance of saturated sands in terms of dilation angle in addition to the usual parameters relative density and blow count. When the chart was used in conjunction with pressuremeter tests, a conservative estimate of liquefaction resistance of a hydraulic fill dam was obtained.