Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-26-1981

Session End Date

5-3-1981

Abstract

In-situ and laboratory shear modulus data are presented and compared. In-situ tests included the cross-hole seismic survey at a stiff marl site, while laboratory tests included the cyclic triaxial test on undisturbed specimens obtained from the same site. The cyclic triaxial device presented in this investigation has been developed and improved so that the reliable response of soil can be measured directly from the specimen over a large range of strain (from 10-6 to 10-2 ). A series of cyclic triaxial tests were performed under stress controlled condition over a range of frequency from 0,5 to 10 Hz on marl samples consolidated anisotropically. Values of shear modulus and damping ration determined for shearing strain amplitude between 10-6 and 10-2 and compared with published results proposed by Seed and Idriss (1970) and Hardin and Drnevich (1972). At low strains, the shear modulus values measured by in-situ and laboratory methods were in a good agreement, but the values from the Hardin-Black's equation were underestimated. The influence of consolidation stress, frequency, and number of load cycles on the shear modulus have also been investigated.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

First Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-26-1981

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1981 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 26th, 12:00 AM May 3rd, 12:00 AM

Dynamic Triaxial and Vibratory In-Situ Behavior of Cohesive Soil

St. Louis, Missouri

In-situ and laboratory shear modulus data are presented and compared. In-situ tests included the cross-hole seismic survey at a stiff marl site, while laboratory tests included the cyclic triaxial test on undisturbed specimens obtained from the same site. The cyclic triaxial device presented in this investigation has been developed and improved so that the reliable response of soil can be measured directly from the specimen over a large range of strain (from 10-6 to 10-2 ). A series of cyclic triaxial tests were performed under stress controlled condition over a range of frequency from 0,5 to 10 Hz on marl samples consolidated anisotropically. Values of shear modulus and damping ration determined for shearing strain amplitude between 10-6 and 10-2 and compared with published results proposed by Seed and Idriss (1970) and Hardin and Drnevich (1972). At low strains, the shear modulus values measured by in-situ and laboratory methods were in a good agreement, but the values from the Hardin-Black's equation were underestimated. The influence of consolidation stress, frequency, and number of load cycles on the shear modulus have also been investigated.