Alternative Title

Paper No. 9.08

Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Date

12 Mar 1998, 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Abstract

This case history demonstrates the use of electromagnetic (EM) induction methods to examine known seepage locations and then predict future ones along the Herbert Hoover Dike (HHD) in south central Florida. The HHD forms an embankment dam 20 to 30 feet high and 140 miles long surrounding Lake Okeechobee. Approximately 26 miles of embankment was surveyed with EM induction. The objective of the EM survey was to identify active and potential foundation seepage locations and conduits. Areas of greater conductivity were often associated with seepage locations observed during a record high water event in October, 1995. These problems included boils and piping of foundation and embankment materials. One great benefit of this investigation was that large areas of competent dike foundations could be separated from areas containing potential problems requiring additional examination.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Meeting Name

4th Conference of the International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1998 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Identification of Potential Seepage Locations Along the Herbert Hoover Dike, Lake Okeechobee FL., by Electromagnetic Geophysical Method. Prediction and Confirmation.

St. Louis, Missouri

This case history demonstrates the use of electromagnetic (EM) induction methods to examine known seepage locations and then predict future ones along the Herbert Hoover Dike (HHD) in south central Florida. The HHD forms an embankment dam 20 to 30 feet high and 140 miles long surrounding Lake Okeechobee. Approximately 26 miles of embankment was surveyed with EM induction. The objective of the EM survey was to identify active and potential foundation seepage locations and conduits. Areas of greater conductivity were often associated with seepage locations observed during a record high water event in October, 1995. These problems included boils and piping of foundation and embankment materials. One great benefit of this investigation was that large areas of competent dike foundations could be separated from areas containing potential problems requiring additional examination.