Alternative Title

Paper No. 7.14

Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Date

10 Mar 1998, 2:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Abstract

The Red Onion Mountain project involved the construction of a high security prison facility in a remote area of southwest Virginia. The site of the proposed construction was covered with a thick layer of uncontrolled mine spoil fill material containing a random matrix of soil and boulders. This material was unsuitable for the proposed construction in its existing condition. Charged with evaluating feasible and cost effective alternatives for site development and structural support, the project's geotechnical engineers devised a two-phase ground improvement plan designed to adequately improve the existing mine spoil fill. Full-time observation, documentation and testing during the site preparation phase provided data that was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the ground improvement procedures. Building construction proceeded on the improved soils after an evaluation of the data indicated the existing mine spoil had been adequately improved.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Meeting Name

4th Conference of the International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1998 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Red Onion Mountain Maximum Security Prison − A Case Study in Ground Improvement

St. Louis, Missouri

The Red Onion Mountain project involved the construction of a high security prison facility in a remote area of southwest Virginia. The site of the proposed construction was covered with a thick layer of uncontrolled mine spoil fill material containing a random matrix of soil and boulders. This material was unsuitable for the proposed construction in its existing condition. Charged with evaluating feasible and cost effective alternatives for site development and structural support, the project's geotechnical engineers devised a two-phase ground improvement plan designed to adequately improve the existing mine spoil fill. Full-time observation, documentation and testing during the site preparation phase provided data that was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the ground improvement procedures. Building construction proceeded on the improved soils after an evaluation of the data indicated the existing mine spoil had been adequately improved.