Title

"I Fear the Consequences to Our Animals" Emigrants and their Livestock on the Overland Trails

Abstract

The article discusses how the diaries, letters, and guidebooks written by the emigrants who crossed North America on the overland trails during the mid-nineteenth century reveal a new awareness of the animals that journeyed with them. Their writings add to the knowledge not only of the rigors and challenges along the overland trails but also of how the emigrants manifested a new relationship with their livestock. In addition to the guidebooks and advice from friends and relatives, emigrants also carried with them a set of religious beliefs about animals forged in the traditional Christian churches. Emigrants believed that humans possessed dominion over all the animals of the earth, and also understood that they must treat their animals well. The basic advice included making slow but steady progress and walking as much as possible, so as not to unduly burden the animals.

Department(s)

History and Political Science

Keywords and Phrases

Animal health; Guidebooks; Humboldt sink; Oregon; Overlanders

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

0275-7664

Document Type

Article - Journal

Document Version

Citation

File Type

text

Language(s)

English

Rights

© 2012 University of Nebraska Press, All rights reserved.

Publication Date

01 Jun 2012

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