Location

Rolla, MO

Session Start Date

6-11-1999

Session End Date

6-17-1999

Keywords and Phrases

Rock Temperature; Heat flow; Thermophysical Measurement

Abstract

A number of thermophysical measurements were carried out at the Meikle mine in Nevada in order to obtain new data concerning heat flows and wall temperatures in a hot mine. This was necessary to verify known methods of heat flow calculation and compare experimental with theoretical results. The Meikle mine was chosen because it is operated in an area of high rock temperature caused by the hydrothermal nature of the deposit and the presence of water at 60°C. The airflow rates in some of the inactive areas and the predicted background rock temperature at the mine are similar to those planned for the isolation of radioactive waste packages (RAW) in an underground repository. Therefore, the measurements in the mine made it possible to obtain real values of heatflows and temperatures in mine openings which will be similar to those expected in the drifts of a future RAW repository. Another objective of the measurement program was to conduct a comprehensive test of a new instrument, developed at the Institute of Engineering Thermophysics in Kiev, to measure the heat flow and temperature of rock. The advantage of the instrument consists in its ability to measure rock temperature and heat flow from strata directly on a rock surface without any need to drill holes or with minimum impact on the rock surface. This makes it possible to measure under conditions where the level of the energy transfer resulting from the rock temperature and moisture content are not affected by drilling or by any heat and mass exchange in a hole. The results obtained were used to calculate values of the overall heat transfer coefficient (the coefficient of unsteady heat exchange) for each measurement location. This coefficient is an important input parameter in most underground mine climate computer simulation programs.

Department(s)

Mining and Nuclear Engineering

Appears In

U.S. Mine Ventilation Symposium

Meeting Name

8th U.S. Mine Ventilation Symposium

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-11-1999

Document Version

Final Version

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Jun 11th, 12:00 AM Jun 17th, 12:00 AM

Non-Destructive Field Measurements of Rock Temperature and Heat Flow in a Hot Mine

Rolla, MO

A number of thermophysical measurements were carried out at the Meikle mine in Nevada in order to obtain new data concerning heat flows and wall temperatures in a hot mine. This was necessary to verify known methods of heat flow calculation and compare experimental with theoretical results. The Meikle mine was chosen because it is operated in an area of high rock temperature caused by the hydrothermal nature of the deposit and the presence of water at 60°C. The airflow rates in some of the inactive areas and the predicted background rock temperature at the mine are similar to those planned for the isolation of radioactive waste packages (RAW) in an underground repository. Therefore, the measurements in the mine made it possible to obtain real values of heatflows and temperatures in mine openings which will be similar to those expected in the drifts of a future RAW repository. Another objective of the measurement program was to conduct a comprehensive test of a new instrument, developed at the Institute of Engineering Thermophysics in Kiev, to measure the heat flow and temperature of rock. The advantage of the instrument consists in its ability to measure rock temperature and heat flow from strata directly on a rock surface without any need to drill holes or with minimum impact on the rock surface. This makes it possible to measure under conditions where the level of the energy transfer resulting from the rock temperature and moisture content are not affected by drilling or by any heat and mass exchange in a hole. The results obtained were used to calculate values of the overall heat transfer coefficient (the coefficient of unsteady heat exchange) for each measurement location. This coefficient is an important input parameter in most underground mine climate computer simulation programs.