Location

Rolla, MO

Session Start Date

6-11-1999

Session End Date

6-17-1999

Keywords and Phrases

Emissions; Diesel Engine; Sootfilter; Catalyst; Exhaust Aftertreatment; Cerium; Particulate Matter; DPM; Regeneration

Abstract

CANMET has been involved in an industry-government program to assess the quality of mine air and to improve the working environment. One aspect of the program is to reduce diesel particulate matter (DPM) generated by heavy-duty diesel vehicles having low exhaust temperature duty cycles. The low exhaust gas temperatures that are common in modem engines lead to insufficient regeneration of diesel particulate filters (DPF). A study was undertaken in partnership with DCL International to examine additive assisted regeneration. This study uses a cerium based fuel-borne catalyst to complete the regeneration of a DPF. Regeneration of a DPF occurs when the accumulated DPM in a filter combusts in a controlled manner. Cerium based fuel-borne catalysts have been used in many other applications worldwide but this is perhaps the first application in an underground mine. The paper describes the results of an underground mine study involving two heavy-duty vehicles, one equipped with a mechanical fuel injected engine and the other equipped with a modem electronic fuel injected engine. In each case, diesel exhaust gas emissions (regulated gases and DPM) were measured during mine production duty cycles with and without the filters and fuel catalyst. Engine exhaust back-pressure and temperatures were also measured to study filter regeneration. The results indicate a substantial reduction in CO, NO2, DPM and EQI (Exhaust Quality Index). The ashes from filters were also analyzed for various chemicals in order to develop a methodology to clean the filters. The reduction in DPM is currently a major concern for the mining industry.

Department(s)

Mining and Nuclear Engineering

Appears In

U.S. Mine Ventilation Symposium

Meeting Name

8th U.S. Mine Ventilation Symposium

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-11-1999

Document Version

Final Version

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Jun 11th, 12:00 AM Jun 17th, 12:00 AM

The Effects of a Diesel Particulate Filter and Fuel Borne Catalyst on Engine Emissions

Rolla, MO

CANMET has been involved in an industry-government program to assess the quality of mine air and to improve the working environment. One aspect of the program is to reduce diesel particulate matter (DPM) generated by heavy-duty diesel vehicles having low exhaust temperature duty cycles. The low exhaust gas temperatures that are common in modem engines lead to insufficient regeneration of diesel particulate filters (DPF). A study was undertaken in partnership with DCL International to examine additive assisted regeneration. This study uses a cerium based fuel-borne catalyst to complete the regeneration of a DPF. Regeneration of a DPF occurs when the accumulated DPM in a filter combusts in a controlled manner. Cerium based fuel-borne catalysts have been used in many other applications worldwide but this is perhaps the first application in an underground mine. The paper describes the results of an underground mine study involving two heavy-duty vehicles, one equipped with a mechanical fuel injected engine and the other equipped with a modem electronic fuel injected engine. In each case, diesel exhaust gas emissions (regulated gases and DPM) were measured during mine production duty cycles with and without the filters and fuel catalyst. Engine exhaust back-pressure and temperatures were also measured to study filter regeneration. The results indicate a substantial reduction in CO, NO2, DPM and EQI (Exhaust Quality Index). The ashes from filters were also analyzed for various chemicals in order to develop a methodology to clean the filters. The reduction in DPM is currently a major concern for the mining industry.